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Human Relations and Diversity Matrix

Human relations and cultural diversity. North Dakota education standards and practices board licensure requires coursework a minimum of two semester hours in multicultural education, including in Native American studies, cultural diversity, strategies for creating learning environments that contribute to positive human relationships, and strategies for teaching and assessing diverse learners including universal design for learning, response to intervention, early intervention, positive behavior interventions and supports. North Dakota graduates applying for licensure meet these requirements through completion of Education Standards and Practices Board‐approved programs that include coursework addressing the multicultural education and Native American studies standard. Teacher preparation programs may meet these requirements through general education, specific content major, professional education requirements, or a combination thereof.

EDUC 240 - Educating Exceptional Students

 EDUC 283 - Understanding Cultural Diversity

 EDUC 352 - Diversity Practicum

EDUC 480/490 - Student Teaching

 

Student Teaching Data

Exit Survey Data

EDUC 352 - Pre/Post Trip Survey

EDUC 283 - Lesson Plan Template and Rubric

EDUC 283 - Collaborative Rubric

EDUC 283 - Lesson Plan and Research Project

EDUC 283 - Family Chart

Strategies for Teacher Education

Human Relations and Diversity

Human relations and cultural diversity: North Dakota education standards and practices board licensure requires coursework a minimum of two semester hours in multicultural education, including in Native American studies, cultural diversity, strategies for creating learning environments that contribute to positive human relationships, and strategies for teaching and assessing diverse learners including universal design for learning, response to intervention, early intervention, positive behavior interventions and supports. North Dakota graduates applying for licensure meet these requirements through completion of Education Standards and Practices Boardapproved programs that include coursework addressing the multicultural education and Native American studies standard. Teacher preparation programs may meet these requirements through general education, specific content major, professional education requirements, or a combination thereof.

 Required Courses:EDUC 283: Understanding Cultural Diversity in Education; EDUC 352: Cultural Diverse Practicum; EDUC 240 - Educating Exceptional Students

The general education program requires the study of multicultural education including Native American studies and strategies for teaching and assessing diverse learners.  The program uses a variety of performance assessments of candidates' understanding and ability to apply that knowledge.   6 semester hours are required to complete the courses which are focused on multicultural education and are designed enable teacher candidates to fully understand the concepts of cultural tolerance, social empowerment, and the intersection of cultures in the global classroom, as well as to provide multiple perspectives and strategies for teaching a culturally diverse population. 

Teacher candidates are required to study the indigenous peoples of North America including tribal perspectives on current events and issues that impact Native Americans in regard to education, social issues, leadership, natural resources and economics.  A PowerPoint presentation and lesson plan is required to demonstrate their knowledge and teach others about their Native American tribe. 

Teacher candidates research, plan, develop, modify, and deliver lessons that address multicultural and diversity themes and incorporate culturally diverse material in the curriculum.  Teacher candidates read, analyze, and discuss the cultures and traditions of various ethnic groups including the African, Asian, Hispanic, European, and Native Americans.  The candidates are required to research, compose, and present an ethnographic timeline project focused on a cultural group that analyzes a theme that spans throughout a significant time period in history. Teacher candidates analyze and identify historical and current issues that may impact the education of students from diverse backgrounds.

Teacher candidates self-reflect, research, analyze, and understand their own culture and its importance in the cross-cultural learning process to develop a baseline for making effective comparisons about cultural differences, understand why people respond in different situations, and increase global awareness.  They are required to document their findings, research, and analysis in a Cultural Journal.

Teacher candidates engage in a gender role interview where they demonstrate understanding of family and family issues and its relation to student learning and of culture as a collageof factors beyond race or national origin. The criterion for the interview is that the student must interview someone of the opposite and ask questions about his/her family values, educational values and expectations, and the role of religion that shaped the interviewee's belief system. Candidates also write journal article reviews on topics including racism, socioeconomic issues and No Child Left Behind.

Candidates demonstrate basic strategies for working with limited English proficient (LEP) candidates in regular classroom settings and apply appropriate strategies for assisting students from an English language learner (ELL) background or challenged socio-economic backgrounds. Candidates will also expand their opportunity to learn in practice and real-world scenarios.

The program requires the study of active engagement in learning.  Candidates use their knowledge and understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior among candidates to foster active engagement in learning, self-motivation, and positive social interaction and to create supportive learning environments. The program uses varied assessments of candidates' understanding and abilities to apply that knowledge.

Teacher candidates explore family issues and their relationship to student learning by conducting an interview to examine the influences of family on learning and cultural patterns.  Candidates use the information gathered from the interview to create a chart that demonstrates how family influences the learning of another person from a different background compares and contrasts to that of their own.

Sample Performance Assessments:

EDUC 283 Educational Goals EDUC 283

COURSE GOAL 1- The first goal of this course is for candidates to demonstrate an awareness of multiculturalism and its impact in the classroom.

Objective 1: The individual should demonstrate knowledge of Native American culture and traditions, as well as other cultural groups.

Objective 2: The individual should describe historical perspectives from Native Americans', and other cultural groups' point of view.

Objective 3:The individual should identify issues that may impact education of candidates from those cultural groups.

EDUC 283 COURSE GOAL 2-The second goal of this course is for candidates to demonstrate their understanding of environment and its relationship to student learning.

Objective 1: The individual will recognize the impact socio-economic status has on culturally diverse candidates and their opportunity to learn.

Objective 2: The individual will demonstrate strategies and be able to demonstrate basic strategies for working with limited English proficient (LEP) candidates in regular classroom settings.

Objective 3:The individual will apply appropriate strategies for assisting candidates from ELL or challenged socio-economic backgrounds and expanding their opportunity to learn in practice scenarios.

Educational Experiences

Educational Experience for Goal 1, Objective 1

The purpose of this activity is for candidates to gain an awareness of the multiculturalism of the United States, particularly North Dakota Native Americans and its impact in the classroom. There are two required textbooks for this course Choosing Democracy: An Examination of Multiculturalism in the United States and Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?  These textbooks present demographic and historical information regarding the varied cultural populations in the United States. Choosing Democracy also contains teaching strategies for teaching to diverse populations, as well as classroom management techniques. Both of these texts are used throughout the 16- week semester in conjunction with one another to give candidates background knowledge of cultural diversity in the U.S. and specific information targeted at North Dakota's Native American populations.

Educational Experience for Goal 1, Objectives 2 & 3

The purpose of this activity is so candidates will know and be able to describe historical perspectives and issues that impact education from underrepresented cultural groups such as Native Americans, and other oppressed cultural groups. The candidates are required to complete and present a timeline project that chronicles the history of the subjugation of the five ND Native American tribes: Lakota/ Dakota, Chippewa, Hidatsa, Mandan, and Arikara to present day. The sources provided for this project are the previously mentioned text, several media sources and guest speakers. The second part of this section of study is a group PowerPoint presentation that highlights one of the current issues impacting Native Americans. Some sample topics are health, inequities in education, or a related contemporary problem.

Once the Native American component of the course has been satisfied, the candidates turn their attention to study other cultural groups that have immigrated to the United States or were forced against their will to migrate. The volatile and dangerous political situations that provided the impetus for much of the political refugee population in Fargo, West Fargo and Grand Forks are also examined. Candidates are required to complete a demographic chart and analysis that shows the origins behind the exodus of the Bosnians, Liberians, Sudanese (ethnic Africans), Somalis, Hmong, and plight of the migrant children in North Dakota.

Educational Experience for Goal 2, Objective 1 

The purpose of these activities are so that candidates will demonstrate their understanding of environment and its relationship to student learning by recognizing the impact that socio-economic status has on culturally diverse candidates and their opportunity to learn.

The textbook, Choosing Democracy: A Practical Guide to Multicultural Education, is examined throughout the 16 weeks of the semester gives the candidates an overview of the tremendous ramifications that culture, racism, gender, socio-economic status has on education, and the American populations most impacted by poverty. An examination of the cyclic nature of poverty and its influence on student learning is the focus resulting in an empathy exercise through role-playing and scenario analyses.

Educational Experience for Goal 2, Objectives 2 & 3

The purpose of these activities are so that candidates will be able to demonstrate basic strategies for working with limited English proficient (LEP) candidates in regular classroom settings, and apply appropriate strategies for assisting candidates from ELL or challenged socio-economic backgrounds and expanding their opportunity to learn in practice scenarios. All of these activities are predicated upon adapting the learning environment to facilitate learning of culturally diverse candidates. Initially the candidates are presented with a variety of multicultural literacy strategies that introduce the concepts of culturally relevant pedagogies for the varied populations of candidates. Then the candidates are presented with typical case studies where they are required to theorize what strategies would work best for each type of learner, the examples run the gamut from economically impacted inner city African American children to Liberian political refugee children in Fargo. The final phase is the application or practicum phase where the candidates are required to go into a culturally diverse classroom, usually on one of the ND reservations (Standing Rock, Fort Berthold, Turtle Mountain, Spirit Lake) or in the Twin Cities in a Hmong public school and teach for 40- hours under the supervision of a licensed teacher.

Assessment Methods and Descriptions

Goal 1; Objective 1:The candidate will demonstrate knowledge of Native American culture and traditions, as well as other cultural groups. This objective is met through a collaborative group project based on a specific North Dakota Native American group.  The second part of the assessment is directed at eliciting the candidates' knowledge of other cultural groups, and cataclysmic events that precipitated the migration of other cultures to the United States. The candidates are required to research, compose, and present an ethnographic timeline project focused on a cultural group that analyzes a theme that spans throughout a significant time period in history. 

 

Goal 2; Objective 2:

The candidate will describe historical perspectives from Native Americans', and other cultural groups' point of view. The candidates are required to complete and then present a timeline project that chronicles the history of the subjugation of the five ND Native American tribes from that culture's perspective: Lakota/ Dakota, Chippewa, Hidatsa, Mandan, and Arikara to present day. The rubric that is used to assess the timelines is based on five criteria: completeness of information, method of organization, relevance of information, citation of sources, and overall presentation of cultural perspectives.

Goal 3; Objective 3:

The candidate will identify issues that may impact education of candidates from those cultural groups. The candidates are required to collaboratively work with a group and put together a PowerPoint presentation, along with a lesson plan, that highlights the history, culture, and one of the current issues in education impacting Native Americans. Some sample topics are health, inequities in education, or a related contemporary problem. Topics must be pre-approved by the instructor prior to the completion of the presentation.

Goal 2; Objective 2 & 3

The candidate will demonstrate strategies and be able to demonstrate basic strategies for working with limited English proficient (LEP) candidates in regular classroom settings and the individual will apply appropriate strategies for assisting candidates from an English language learner (ELL) background or challenged socio-economic backgrounds and expanding their opportunity to learn in practice and real- world scenarios.

EDUC 352: Cultural Diverse Practicum:

Through a cultural diversity practicum, the candidate will understand the changing demographics regarding ethnicity, race, culture, religion, language, and socioeconomic status as well as the cultural, ethnic, social class, gender, emotional, intellectual, and physical aspects of human differences. The proficiencies that support learning are demonstrated by all candidates as shown in their work with students with exceptionalities and those from diverse, ethnic, racial, gender, and socioeconomic groups in classrooms and schools. These objectives are achieved by completing a 25-hour practicum in a culturally diverse setting. Individuals keep a daily journal and reflect on their observations and practices in working with candidates from diverse, ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic groups. Finally, they prepare a 5-10 reflective paper that demonstrates how this experience enhanced their knowledge about diversity.

The candidates will be able to:

  • Understand the changing United States and world demographics regarding ethnicity, race, culture, religion, language, and socioeconomic status
  • Understand the cultural, ethnic, social class, gender, emotional, intellectual, and physical aspects of human differences
  • Understand the proficiencies that support learning by all students as shown in their work with students with exceptionalities and those from diverse, ethnic, racial, gender, and socioeconomic groups in classrooms and schools
  • Understand the role of diversity and equity in the teaching and learning process
  • Complete a 25 hour practicum in a culturally diverse setting.
  • Work with ELL students
  • Reflect on their observations and practices in working with students from diverse, ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic groups.
  • Prepare a 5-10 page paper that reflects what was learned from the 25 hour field experience and how the experience enhanced their knowledge about diversity
  • Meet the Global Awareness Ability for the electronic portfolio for graduation

 

 

Diversity Practicum

Pre-/Post- Diversity Practicum

Teacher candidates in the EDUC 352 practicum are assigned to complete a survey prior to their diversity practicum field experience and then shortly after. The assessment asks candidates to share their perceptions of their own knowledge and comfort level in four areas.

Diversity Pre-Trip & Post-Trip Self-Assessment

5: Very knowledgeable and comfortable
4: Fairly knowledgeable and comfortable
3: Somewhat knowledgeable and comfortable
2: Little knowledge and uncomfortable
1: Unaware and uncomfortable

Pre-trip

Mean

5

4

3

2

1

The demographics of your classroom will impact the lessons you teach.

3.54 / 625

12.48%

37.76%

40.96%

8.64%

0.16%

You will be able to exhibit an attitude of fairness and respect toward all learners in your classroom.

4.39 / 625

51.52%

37.92%

9.12%

1.28%

0.16%

You will adapt instructional materials to match student needs.

3.74 / 626

20.77%

38.98%

34.66%

5.11%

0.48%

You will manage your classroom to promote equity and tolerance.

4.22 / 627

42.58%

39.55%

15.63%

1.91%

0.32%

 

Post-trip

Mean

5

4

3

2

1

The demographics of your classroom will impact the lessons you teach.

4.49 / 528

55.30%

39.39%

4.55%

0.76%

0%

You will be able to exhibit an attitude of fairness and respect toward all learners in your classroom.

4.79 / 528

80.30%

18.37%

1.14%

0%

0.19%

You will adapt instructional materials to match student needs.

4.56 / 529

59.74%

36.67%

3.21%

0.38%

0%

You will manage your classroom to promote equity and tolerance.

4.77 / 529

80.15%

17.77%

1.51%

0.38%

0.19%

Analysis: The data indicate that teacher candidates tend to feel least knowledgeable and comfortable in the areas of understanding how classroom demographics will impact the lessons they teach and understanding how they will adapt their instructional materials to match the needs of their students. The confidence level of the candidates appears to increase substantially after the trip. The mean score totals and the percentage of "5" ratings are much higher in each of the four selected areas. The data also indicate that approximately 84% of those candidates who complete the pre-trip survey follow-up through to finish the post-trip survey.

Action:  The diversity field experience continues to be rated as students as one of their memorable and meaningful learning opportunities. Selecting four areas of focus on for assessment gives the students four things to think about while they are observing or co-teaching. The areas do not limit their learning, but they do add direction increase awareness, focus and learning related to those areas. Realizing the context for learning and demographics of a classroom, having an attitude of fairness and respect, being able to see the need to adapt instruction, and ideas for managing a classroom. Each of these four areas is worthy of special attention during this field experience.  On a less significant note, the data indicate that assessment coordinator and the course instructors can communicate about a solution for an even higher percentage of follow through on the post-trip ratings.

Examples of student responses to the following request after the post-trip ratings:

Please list modifications you will make as a teacher to assist diverse learners in your classroom.

My cooperating teacher had seemingly very good relationships with many of her students and was respected as an educator and role model. Watching her interact with her students, I learned the importance of a balance between these two aspects and the importance of treating all students fairly according to the institutions rules and standards. By observing many classrooms of different demographics and learning levels, I also realized just how difficult adapting to different learning styles and levels can and may be in my future classroom. I think this realization as a pre-service teacher will only enhance my ability in the future by helping me consider different techniques before I enter the classroom. My teacher stressed the importance of keeping contacts close and referring to her or other teachers I observe in the future for ideas and lessons.

As a teacher I want to be as effectives as I can to reach a majority of my students. In my introduction to elementary education I learned that in order to be effective teacher I have to reach 80% of my students 80% of the time. I feel that in order to reach this level of effectiveness I have to adapt my methods of teaching. 1. Arrange students in the classroom according to their needs; high needs students will have "quicker" access to myself, based on where I seat them. 2. Accommodate the students by teaching them on the level at which they are currently at, while still managing to challenge them to exceed their goals. 3. Meeting any IEP goals. 4. Encourage the use of native language, while still maintaining the growth of their English vocabulary. 5. Being sensitive to the differences in socioeconomic statuses of my students; making sure that all of the students have access to the same supplies needed to complete their work effectively. 6. I will be mindful that not all students come from a stable home environment that has a mother/father resource available to them. 7. Being available to my students on the level at which they need me.

The biggest thing I learned from my field experience is no matter where a person goes to teach, kids are going to be kids no matter what their cultural background is. The second most valuable thing I learned was work hard to relate material to the diverse student population because the more material you can relate the more learning can take place.

All students have great potential as long as educators take the time to help them bring it out in themselves. - Other cultures may have different customs or beliefs and those customs and beliefs must be protected and promoted in the classroom. - All students must be given the chance to build their self-confidence and must be given chances to develop leadership among their peers instead of being stifled by the instructor.

I will adapt my lessons to fit the need of the students. If I have a student who is struggling with a topic I will make sure to change my methods of teaching so I break the lesson down into smaller steps. I will also try and keep my learners active and engaged in class by using many different learning styles. I will try and include activities for auditory, visual, and hands on learners.

I learned the importance of parent-teacher communication and differentiating instruction. By including the parents, the teachers will understand the student's background and the parents will be more aware and willing to help their children. Teachers need to put extra time and effort for the communication, such as through weekly behavior and academic reports. Also, because many students will be at different levels in different content areas, the teacher should be willing to work with each student and build off what each student already knows.

InTASC 2 Student Teacher Data

EDUC 352 pre-trip verses post-trip

EDUC 283 - Lesson Plan and Research Project

EDUC 240 - Syllabus

EDUC 283 Syllabus

EDUC 352 Syllabus

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